What Good Teaching Looks Like: Digital Research

As per the Common Core State Standards students must incorporate digital research in their work.  I interpret this to mean that students need a twenty-first century version of book sense.  We used to teach students how to find books in a library, how to determine who the author and illustrator is, and where to find copyright information.  We now need to teach them how to determine keywords, know how to search, be able to determine who created a particular web page and evaluate a page for bias and reliability.

How do you do this and what does it look like in a classroom?

Let me be clear, I’m a fan of digital libraries (LAUSD teachers should check out the LAUSD Digital Library).  However, in addition to putting expensive high quality pre-vetted resources in front of students we also need to be teaching them how to choose keywords and use Google like a pro.

Picking Keywords

Beginning in kindergarten I would be modeling how to pick keywords before entering them in the Google search box and finding results.  For example, let’s say you’re researching where an octopus lives.  Say to students,

“I’m looking for information on where the octopus lives.  What words should I search for?”

With your help, students should come up with something like “octopus home” or “octopus habitat” depending how much academic language  you’ve seeded.

This two minute step would go a long way toward building effective researchers.

Sharon Sutton at the UCLA lab school has compiled and created some resources to help.  Scroll down to the Information Literacy Worksheets, in particular the keywords and synonyms one which asks students to list keywords and synonyms for a research question.

Advanced Googling

Familiarize yourself with the Google Cheat sheet.

In particular, know that using quotes allows you to search for a particular name or phrase e.g. “Mathew Needleman” gives you only people with my first and last name rather than any page with both my first and last name, possibly disconnected on the page.

Also know that using the minus sign “-” eliminates results.  For example, when searching for information about the band, The Eagles, you might search “eagles -football” (eliminating results about the football team).  In this example, you will likely need to add keywords to specify information specific about the band and not the bird.

Bias and Reliability

Students should always check for an “about this page” link.  If there isn’t one, move on to another site.  I’m a fan of the site All About Explorers, it’s created by teachers and gives absolutely false information about famous explorers.  Will students catch the errors or will they report that Columbus was born in Australia?  Students always need to triangulate the data, find information from multiple sources to eliminate inconsistencies and gain depth.

Have any tips to add?  Post them below.

 

Technology in the Common Core: What Do Students Need to be Able to Do?

 

 

 

While there are no isolated technology standards in the Common Core State Standards, technology is embedded across the the grade levels.  Many people are focused on students needing a device to take the assessment and not thinking about what students will need to be able to do with that device.  The assessment will not only require a computer for students to take it, students will actually be tested on their use of their device.

According to the language arts standards here are the three major things students will need to be able to do.

1.  Research

Students will:

Use search tools.

Interpet interactive elements on a web page.

Draw on information from digital sources.

2.  Writing

Students will:

Explore a variety of digital tools to produce and publish writing including in collaboration with peers.

3.  Multimedia

Students will:

Ask and answer questions about key details in [multi]media…

Include multimedia elements…in presentations.

I haven’t separated the standards by grade level.  The same requirements exist at all grade levels with different amounts of teacher assistance and depth and complexity.

In future posts I will suggest sample activities to meet each standard.  If you want a preview, please check out my slideshare presentation, Technology in the Common Core.

 

 

 

 

 

 

What Equipment Do I Need to Make Movies?

A reader question:

I’ve always been interested in TV Production and am thinking about writing a grant to start one.   Our school has no funding for this, so I don’t even know where to start. What equipment do I need? How much will it cost?

I’ve learned that nothing goes out of fashion faster than equipment recommendations.  However, here are my best recommendations for today.

Cheapest

Your iPhone, iPad, or iPod Touch with iMovie installed is all you need to start making movies.  $200-$500.

Better

I’m using a T3i DSLR camera that is excellent for still images but also shoots 1080p 24 frames per second high definition video.  $400-$600

For sound, I use a boom microphone which can attach directly to the camera to shoot better sound.  $100-$350

You will also need editing software, either iMovie (free with any Mac) or Final Cut Pro X ($300).

The T3i shoots excellent video in low-light situations.  However, you may wish to add some lighting to your setup.

It’s Not About the Apps Keynote Now Live

I’m pleased to announce that my keynote presentation for the K12 Online Conference is now live and will be archived indefinitely so you can watch it whenever. In this fifteen minute presentation I share a little bit about how taking photos with my phone sparked something of a creative renaissance in my life and talk about my thoughts on how this might apply to our classrooms. I am very much interested in your ideas as my thinking on the subject keeps evolving. Please leave your comments below.

See the movie here.

K12 Online Conference Trailer: It’s Not About the Apps

The K12Online Conference is on now (and forever).  The conference is free and asynchronous…this means you will never “miss” it,  you can watch the presentations whenever.

I’ve presented twice for the conference before, my favorite being Film School for Video Podcasters in which I play a detective and  explain how to make better classroom movies.

This year I was asked to be the keynote speaker for the Kicking it up a Notch strand.  I’m not wearing any costumes this year but I do speak from the heart about what taking photos with my phone has meant for me, nothing short of a creative renaissance, and explain the implications that this could have for our classrooms.

Please take a moment to view my 30 second teaser trailer.  The actual presentation goes live on 10/29 (but remember, you can see it any time after that).

It’s Not About the Apps